Archive for the 'JBoss' category

The JBoss Virtual Experience

Do you know what’s happening in middleware? Budget crunch keeping you from attending industry gatherings? Bring the conference to your desktop. Take a minute (or a few hours) and attend the JBoss Virtual Experience.

Wednesday, February 11th, 2009 LIVE online
(on-demand February 16th – May 11th, 2009)

Find out more or register now.

JBVE_map

Join our executives, key developers, and your business peers. Attend keynote sessions for executive insight into the future of open source and the middleware roadmap for 2009 and beyond. Visit the Exhibit Hall and chat live with booth representatives. Come to the Networking Cafe for in-depth technical and business discussions, birds-of-a-feather chats, and live Q&A with our speakers.
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Interview: Chris Morgan on Jopr

JBoss Operations Network (JON) recently became available as an open source solution through the Jopr project. (That’s pronounced “jopper.”) We interviewed Chris Morgan from Red Hat’s JON group to learn more.

1. What does Jopr do?
Jopr is an open source project that provides an integrated management platform that simplifies the development, testing, deployment, and monitoring of your JBoss technologies. From a single console you can inventory and monitor resources from the operating system to deployed applications. It also lets users control and audit application configurations to standardize deployments. It’s a robust solution to manage, monitor, and tune your applications for improved visibility, performance, and availability.

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JBoss Drools how-to: Tuning Guvnor, part 2

Guvnor is the business rules management system in Drools 5. When you deploy it out of the box, you get an unsecured web application that stores data in Jackrabbit’s embedded Derby database.

This two-part article explains how to tune Guvnor deployed on JBoss Application Server 4.2.3. (If you missed the first half of the series, catch up in our archives.)This means that we will use the container’s configuration files and security infrastructure. This installment covers enabling password validation based on an OpenLDAP server, moving from the default data repository, and enabling SSL for better security. » Read more


JBoss Drools how-to: Tuning Guvnor, part 1

Guvnor is the business rules management system in Drools 5. When you deploy it out of the box, you get an unsecured web application that stores data in Jackrabbit’s embedded Derby database.

The first half of this series explains how to tune Guvnor deployed on JBoss Application Server 4.2.3. This means that we will use the container’s configuration files and security infrastructure. We will cover enabling password validation based on an OpenLDAP server, moving from the default data repository, and enabling SSL for better security in part 2. » Read more


Rules and Drools Rundown

It’s been a good few weeks for stories and information about JBoss Rules and Drools, the open source project upstream of the JBoss subscription offering. Here is a quick summary of the recent stories. Post a comment if you know of any others we all should pay attention to.


JBoss Drools meets Hibernate

Jaroslaw is a JBoss QA Engineer based in Poland, and recently published an introduction to Drools that he kindly shared with us. This second piece covers Drools (or JBoss Rules), the open source business rules engine… in this case combining it with Hibernate.

This article is presented here in its entirety (with a trackback). The original can be found on Jaroslaw’s site. This article is also available in German and Polish.

Justification:

Drools evaluates facts which are present in the working memory. But could it also reason over data stored in a relational database? This feature would extend Drools’ range of applicability and since this is an often asked question in the mailing list, it’s worth to know the answer which sounds: “of course Drools can!”

Abstract:

Hibernate, one of the most favorite ORM tools, allows to handle data stored in a relational database. This article will describe how one can access a Hibernate session from inside the rule engine. I will use PostgreSQL as a data source. Besides that I will create two classes, Game and Player, having a many-to-many relationship. » Read more


Introduction to Drools: Rules fall from your eyes

One of our long-time writers introduced us to Jaroslaw, a JBoss QA Engineer based in Poland, and mentioned that he’d been working on some documentation we might find interesting. And, boy, do we! This first piece de-mystifies the complex world of rules engines. Whether you call it Drools, or JBoss Rules, or JBoss Drools… you still might want to know what it does and how it functions in your technical environment. (Not to mention that it’s just all kinds of logical and interesting–if you like brainteaser word puzzles or abstract math questions, this qualifies as pleasure reading.)

This article is presented here in its entirety (with a trackback). The original can be found on Jaroslaw’s site. This article is also available in German and Polish.

Justification:

Either you’re a developer, architect or a business analyst, it’s worth to get familiar at least with the first chapter of this article. It contains an introduction into the world of rule engines, which increase the readability of certain applications and make them easier to manage and to maintain. It applies to apps that take decisions, which depend on events or a state of some objects.

Abstract:

This article contains an introduction to rule engines, a description of an installation of Eclipse IDE and a guide how to configure Eclipse with the Drools Workbench plug-in. » Read more


JBoss Application Server 5 CR1 available

The first candidate release (CR1) for JBoss Application Server 5 has been released. There is a lot of good background from Sacha Labourey and feature details from project lead Dimitris Andreadis. Now that version 5 of the new application server has been through alpha and beta stages, this candidate release is a great opportunity for developers to get knowledge and practice on the next gen app server.

(Tip of the hat for Ales Justin’s post about the CR1. Ales also posts new information about SpringDeployer and VFS .)


Adapters for an ESB

One of the joys of software development is the ease with which you can create complex stuff out of thin air–or your own imagination. Creating new software may fulfill a need that could not otherwise be met. However, you can take advantage of a standardized way of doing things, so that you don’t have to start from scratch every single time. In the case of infrastructure software, using an established standard enables you to concentrate on your specific business needs, and not the supporting systems.

The seed of this article is actually a comment on the first article[1] in this series. In that first article, I described middleware as though it were plumbing. I chose to use this analogy as the term “middleware” is often misunderstood. My rationale for the plumbing analogy was that plumbing and middleware share these characteristics:

First, it’s mostly invisible. Second, it provides a standard way of doing things. Third, it ties together parts of complex systems. Fourth, and finally, it lets you worry about other things. » Read more


More how to get OpenJDK

A previous post, How to get OpenJDK 6 for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, covered how to install OpenJDK for Fedora Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux (EPEL) 5. Now these instructions are at an even easier URL to remember:

http://openjdk.java.net/install/#fedora

These instructions cover installing OpenJDK 6 for Fedora 9 and EPEL 5, as well as IcedTea 7 for Fedora 8. IcedTea 7 provides the OpenJDK 7 development branch with IcedTea components to make it build under Fedora using entirely open source components. The package name remains the same in the repository, despite the trademark agreement allowing the OpenJDK mark to be used by Fedora, because it is considered too disruptive to rename it now.