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Inside One Laptop per Child: Episode one

by Julie Bryce

(video)  This is the story of the little green laptop that could. Meet the faces behind the One Laptop per Child initiative and see what they do every day in the Cambridge, MA office. Sit in on a brainstorming session. And find out what you can do to help.

Download this video: [ogg]

Tune in to this new video series to keep tabs on the education-meets-technology project that’s going to change the world. Want to learn more? Visit the One Laptop per Child website to donate or to write an activity for the laptop.

Other related videos: Inside One Laptop per Child, episode 02.

29 responses to “Inside One Laptop per Child: Episode one”

  1. Peteris Krisjanis says:

    More of such material is needed! This is excelent, nice video :)

  2. Jakub Steiner says:

    Very, very nicely done.

  3. Simon Turner says:

    this is what technology is supposed to do, well done to red hat, for trying to make the world flat again (a level playing field). Shame on microsoft and apple, shame on all those who close the door on their source codes.

  4. Ramzi Jalajel says:

    Great idea done by Red Hat especially of targeting the Education with 100$.

  5. Al C says:

    Long live open source!!!

    Giant software will NEVER get it.

  6. One Laptop Per Child News says:

    Meet the OLPC Team Behind the “Sugarized” User Interface

    After two days of constant OLPC XO BTest-3 hardware upgrade coverage, thoughts, and impacts, its time to remember the greater vision, the complete One Laptop Per Child program. What better way to remember that this project is about people, not machine…

  7. Charbax says:

    Great video, I’ve posted it at http://olpc.tv/2007/03/26/episode-one/

  8. Germán Poó-Caamaño says:

    To Whom belongs the music?

    There is no credits, but the music is pretty nice, specially for that report.

  9. Alex says:

    Hermoso.. Hermoso I have no words to describe how beautifull you people are… keep up the awsome work!!!!

  10. Kendrick Wilson says:

    We need this in rural Mississippi.

  11. Josh says:

    So I am pretty sure that Brazilian guy wasn’t Brazilian, but was Frodo! Elijah, we caught you! you can stop playing, we know you want to help the cause, so you can stop acting! Good Job!

  12. Rich says:

    Did he say “Pentagram Software”? I think all these good intentions will eventually be used for the self serving ambitions of some tin-horn despot who even now is laughing hysterically at all these do-gooders who are going to help him control the minds of his subjects. If millions of “children are going to get these $100 laptops that means 100’s of millions for the Red Hat OLPC team…right? Now I get it!

  13. Antonio says:

    To the posting April 3rd by Rich. If all good intentions did not have a benefit or potential gain, I fear most everyone would be “me me me”. Would you donate $1000 if you could not get the tax write off? The world revolves around industry. This is a potentially huge market, and if corporations take notice of how this can add to their bottom line this will foster competition – with competition comes investment and innovation. I say the “do-gooders” recognize this as a vehicle to make a difference and make a much needed change that is a “win-win” for all; these are highly educated and intelligent people. Bravo!

  14. Julie says:

    Hi Germán Poó-Caamaño:
    I found out the music information you were looking for. The artist’s name is Adrianna Krikl. Here’s her MySpace page for her music.

    http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendid=59547815

    She has her own site too. http://www.adriannatunes.com/

    Thanks, Julie

  15. Anatole says:

    What an incredible project; it is almost perfect because it only needs one thing; I think that every school that receives these laptops need at least one maintenance shop just for the laptop; As an idea, may be instead of hiring an individual, the eldest kids in the school could be taught how to maintain the laptop or OLPC could set an instructional website (in all the different languages) dedicated to maintenance; this will ensure that the program will live and and its goals will be fully met;As any other technological tool, the $100 dollard laptop will require maintainance at one point or another;

    One thing to keep also in mind is that it is cheaper to maintain electronics in other countries; Believe, people don’t just throw it out once it stops working or shows some functionalit problem.

  16. Sigard Keith says:

    All industries should follow your example when it comes to education of our children. “Bravo” for leading the way!

  17. Julie says:

    German,to answer your question about music in this episode, from earlier this spring:
    Her name is Adrianna Krikl. Here’s her MySpace page for her music.

    http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendid=59547815

    She has her own site too. http://www.adriannatunes.com/

  18. Holiday says:

    One thing to keep also in mind is that it is cheaper to maintain electronics in other countries; Believe, people don’t just throw it out once it stops working or shows some functionalit problem.

  19. For the cause says:

    this is a fantastic project and is going to cause huge advances in the education of these children. Congratulations to the unselfish and hard working people invloved in the One Laptop Per Child programme. You are truly modern hero’s.

  20. bonnie Dewey says:

    How are these supposed to be powered? was there something of solar or hand generated? What of the ones for the donations? Is there an alternate source than electicity of plugging into the electricity grid? I can’t find much about this.

    Bonnie

  21. Harrison Judd says:

    I don’t know how many people saw the article the last week of Nov. 2007 in the Wall Street Journal – but Intel and Microsoft have been trying to squash this project for some time now. Intel now has someone on the board and they have signed a “nondisparagement” clause, which they have apparently not been living up to. Bill Gates stated “Geez, get a decent computer where you can actually read the text and you’re not sitting there cranking the thing while you’re trying to type.” Intel has put forward their own model to compete. Unrestrained capitalism gone amok.

  22. Simon E. says:

    I think the idea is nice but misguided for a few reasons:

    1) $100 can provide an awful lot of food, teaching resources, materials, equipment, crops, live stock etc. for a whole community to use. To send a box of laptops to a village of mud huts in Africa is just a slap in the face.

    2) what are we expecting these IT literate people to be doing in 10 years time when they’re happily speaking English, have IT kit that they’re very comfortable using but no money and very little chance of any kind of legitimate career in their own country? a) you’ve just caused all the newly educated people to abandon their villages for work, which in turn will create a cheap labour force for the west to exploit as well as cause a huge increase in immigration to western countries. or b) you’ve tooled and educated the next generation of cyber criminals because its going to be a whole lot easier to make money illegally than legitimately. These educated people may even be forced to use their IT skills and equipment illegally by people with far my driven than we are.

    We really should tackle the basic needs of all these people all around the world before sending them laptops.

    iImon.

  23. Ravi Kumar says:

    It’s very nice.

  24. Daryl says:

    Give a man a fish, he eats for a day.

    Teach him to fish, he eats the rest of his life.

    It’s amazing how many people just don’t get it.

  25. Ilyas says:

    Unbelievable! First that $100 is being provided by the governments – who as the previous respondent realise that by empowering their children through enhancing their education – will provide dividends that far exceed their original investments. The laptop is a tangible result of governmental assistance whereas if that money was given as Aid it would probably be syphoned off by bureaucrats or end up in a Swiss bank account.

    The unintended consequences of unleashing computing power on poorer countries are totally unknown. There will be new and exciting innovations in computing and software that people in the so called first world will lap up (pun intended).

    As for cyber criminals – don’t we have them already? Its like saying lets not give cars to poor countries because we already know that thousands of people are killed in motorcar accidents every year. But its okay for us to still own and use cars, ludicrous!

    As soon as the OLPC allows people in Europe to buy one and give one away I shall participate.

  26. S RAVI KUMAR says:

    Yes, it is commendable for creating a knowledge society in the coming days and is a blessing to the children.

  27. One laptop per child » Computador barato. Controlo digital says:

    [...] Red Hat Magazine | Inside One Laptop per Child: Episode one This is the story of the little green laptop that could. Meet the faces behind the One Laptop per Child initiative and see what they do every day in the [...]

  28. Maitrella » INSIDE OLPC says:

    [...] La gente de Red Hat Magazine ha iniciado un videoblog con contenidos acerca del proyecto OLPC. Por el momento sólo han publicado un vídeo pero vendrán otros. [...]

  29. praveen jayant says:

    i have invented the car which will run without the help of petroleum feul. it willl be run with the help of concept of levitation and magnetic propertyv of attrction and repulsion